Biblical Theology

From Beelines to Plotlines: Typology That Follows the Covenental Topography of Scripture

Perhaps you have heard or repeated Charles Spurgeon’s famous axiom, “I take my text and make a beeline to the cross.” The trouble is Charles Spurgeon probably never said it.1 Worse, the simplistic axiom fails to account for the textual shape and biblical contours of the Bible, not to mention the infelicitous way it misjudges…

Typology and Allegory: Is There a Distinction? A Brief Examination of Figural Reading

Any study of typology in recent days must account for allegory and elucidate if any distinction should be maintained between the two. In this brief article, I will sketch out the recent emphasis on figural reading1 before critiquing this nomenclature and approach in the process of advancing four reasons that interpreters of Scripture should understand…

A True and Greater Boaz: Typology and Jesus in the Book of Ruth

Introduction The Book of Ruth is not the only Old Testament (OT) book with a genealogy, but it is the only one with a genealogy in its closing verses.1 In fact, the content of the genealogy may be the whole reason the Book of Ruth was written.2 The last word of the final verse is…

“Whatever You Ask” for the Missionary Purposes of the Eschatological Temple: Quotation and Typology in Mark 11-12

The beginning of the Gospel of Mark anticipates—right away—that the narrative will climax at the Jerusalem temple. This “gospel” of Jesus Christ in Mark 1:1 is “as it is written” (καθὼς γέγραπται; 1:2) in Isaiah. The meaning of “gospel,” therefore, should be sought in the first place in Isaiah, specifically in the context of Isaiah…

Searching for the Second Adam: Typological Connections between Adam, Joseph, Mordecai, and Daniel

Introduction Those who champion orthodoxy rightly eschew doctrinal deviations in favor of proven, tested theological conclusions, but also demand that each new generation of Christian thinkers read the Scriptures afresh. Conservative theologians live, readily and occasionally happily, in such a tension. It is, after all, part of what it means to receive, maintain and pass…

Editorial: Reflections on the Significance of Biblical Theology

In recent years, “biblical theology” as a discipline has grown in evangelical theology which has resulted in positive results. However, there are still differences in regard to its definition and why it is important. Since this issue of SBJT is devoted to the larger topic of biblical theology and various themes within it, it may…

The Significance of Covenants in Biblical Theology

Glory Veiled in the Tabernacle of Flesh: Exodus 33-34 in the Gospel of John

The Nature of the New Covenant: A Case Study in Ephesians 2:11-22

“The Glory of God” – The Character of God’s Being and Way in the World: Some Reflections on a Key Biblical Theology Theme

SBJT 19.3: 2 Corinthians (Complete)

Table of Contents (Fall 2015)

Editorial: Learning from Paul’s Second Letter to Corinth

Every year we devote one issue of SBJT to a study Lifeway’s January Bible study book. For 2016, our focus is on Paul’s second letter to the Corinthian church. In focusing our attention on this specific book of Scripture, I am reminded about the story told by Kent Hughes regarding one of the world’s most…

What is So New About the New Covenant? Exploring the Contours of Paul’s New Covenant Theology in 2 Corinthians 3

Second Corinthians 3 is a hotly debated and difficult text. For example, Thomas Schreiner says 2 Corinthians 3 is “one of the most controverted texts in the Pauline corpus,” and is “full of exegetical difficulties and knotty problems.” David Garland believes the passage is “notoriously obscure” and Anthony Hanson says it is the “mount Everest…

Exodus 34, the Middoth and the Doctrine of God: The Importance of Biblical Theology to Evangelical Systematic Theology