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Augustine Collegiate Review

Editorial: The Inaugural Issue of the Augustine Collegiate Review

The inaugural issue of the Augustine Collegiate Review. That simple phrase bears far more weight than might first appear. The journal, a product of The Augustine Honors Collegium of Boyce College, aims to stand out from amongst the vast sea of publications already on the market. In fact, the publishing world appears to be so…

Editorial: The Vision of the Augustine Collegiate Review

Our vision for the Augustine Collegiate Review is to publish an academic, Christ-honoring, and accessible journal, benefiting both the academy and the lay-person. We seek to provide an opportunity for Christian scholars to conduct independent research on topics they find personally engaging and appropriate for the building up of the church. As the next generation…

Divine Timelessness Defined and Defended

This paper concerns itself with objections to the doctrine of divine timelessness. Since, however, the doctrine needs careful articulation before such objections can be considered, I begin by briefly defining it. In so doing, I elucidate three distinct positions that its advocates may take. Finally, I consider objections to the doctrine which have appeared in…

The Everlasting God

I had not given the subject of time much thought until, as a fairly new professor at Wheaton, I picked up a 1975 Eerdmans Festschrift for a long-time Calvin professor — God and the Good: Essays in Honor of Henry Stob. One of the chapters was “God Everlasting” by Nicholas Wolterstorff, a piece that has…

Book Review: Totis

A slim, unassuming book, J Joseph Kazden’s TotIs is an unusual blend of Eastern mysticism, quantum mechanics, Socratic dialogues, and a healthy dose of perceptual denial. With a background in mathematics, chemistry, and psychology, Kazden has devoted his life to a pursuit of the nature of perception and reality. His current work as an artist…

Book Review: Religion, Metaphysics, and the Postmodern: William Desmond and John D. Caputo

Nietzsche’s assertion, “God is dead,” in the late nineteenth century ushered in a new age of Western philosophy. Prior to the Enlightenment, metaphysical questions were viewed as prior to epistemological questions. As story goes, the Enlightenment converted the order of priority, not only giving epistemology priority over metaphysics, but also relegating metaphysical questions to the…

Fantastical Ideals

All people are philosophers. What we believe, think, and feel about the substance and experience of life forms our comprehensive philosophy. The degree of thought we put into the differing subjects of “traditional” philosophy (metaphysics, epistemology and axiology) will determine whether we classify ourselves as professional philosophers, laypersons, or the uninitiated. Our beliefs are reflected…

Redeeming Home: A Christian Theology of Place in a Placeless World

In 2011, a sleepy southern town gave everything to one of its own. Ruthie Leming was a wife, a mother of three daughters, and a well-loved middle school teacher in Starhill, Louisiana. And she was dying. When Ruthie and her brother Rod were growing up, Starhill was a town of nearly 2,000 people. It was…

A Practical Philosophy of Beauty: Dialoguing with Scruton and Wolterstorff

Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon is a brutal, graphic, and disturbing portrayal of man’s ability to use art to critique the actions of his peers, to inform a blinded public of their sins, and make complicit his audience in the crime it portrays. It is an eight foot tall slap in the face by the…

Redefining Humanity: Evaluating the Metaphysical Concerns of Transhumanist Ideals

Consider for a moment, as Plato once did, a man in a cave, chained to the dusty ground with nothing but the stone wall before him. The inside of the cave is dark, aside from the fire burning in the background with flames creating just enough light to make out the faces of four men…